Photography Christmas Wishlist from Kindred Photography Workshop

In need of camera gear?

Whether you're looking to get your first camera, or you're ready to add a few new accessories to the mix, we've got a great list of suggestions for your wish list this Christmas!

If you're about to buy your first basic, starter camera with manual mode capabilities, read all about our top camera suggestions here.  As always, contact us if you’re needing more help making decisions!

Most starter cameras do come with kit lenses, but we love what we call the "nifty fifty", or the 50 mm 1.8 lens. It's an affordable addition to your camera gear and such a great piece of equipment that can really take your photographs to the next level. Read about our favorite lens recommendations here.

If you're ready to learn manual mode and take creative control of your photographs, check your calendar for the next Kindred Photography Workshops! We have three upcoming workshops in Spring 2019. Will you be joining us? Register HERE

We’ve put together a quick wish list that includes everything you need as a budding photographer, mom tog, and/or beginner.

Be sure to email us with any questions, especially about cameras and lenses, at kindredphotographyworkshop@gmail.com. We love helping you get started, and making sure you've got everything you need to grab a seat at our next workshop! 

With Love,

Angela + Kacey

6 Tips for Finding the Best Lighting Outside for Photographs

You've probably heard or learned by now, photography is ALL ABOUT LIGHTING.  To take better photographs, it's critical to understand how to capture that light.  Last week on the blog we were talking about "6 tips for finding the best natural light inside your home." If you missed it, you can find it in the post right before this one!

Today we'll teach you several things you can do to make the best use of natural outdoor lighting when shooting in manual mode.  Unless you are wanting to achieve a look with strong shadows you probably don't want to go outside at high noon and take pictures of your subject in direct sunlight.  These strong shadows can cause unflattering distortion in perception.

1. Find diffused sunlight

Diffused sunlight is soft and even and makes photographing outside easier. Take notice of your surroundings and you'll likely find several places throughout the day which make perfect spots to take photographs like on the shady side of a building or underneath some trees.

#1 Find Diffused Light, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Lighting Outside for Photographs” , by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Hazel and Haze Photography

#1 Find Diffused Light, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Lighting Outside for Photographs”, by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Hazel and Haze Photography

2. Use open Shade

Find a nice shady spot under a tree, porch or canopy.  If you are photographing in a place without trees, look for the shadow of a building or in an alley. This works well for portraits!

#2 Use Open Shade, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Lighting Outside for Photographs” , by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Hazel and Haze Photography

#2 Use Open Shade, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Lighting Outside for Photographs”, by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Hazel and Haze Photography

3. Shoot on Overcast Days

On overcast days, the sun is hidden behind a sheet of clouds.  The clouds act as a natural diffuser of the sunlight.  Overcast days are your friend!! It gives you a lot more flexibility of the direction you place your subjects, as well as flexibility of timing of day that you shoot.  

#3 Shoot on Overcast Days, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Lighting Outside for Photographs” , by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Kacey Gilpin

#3 Shoot on Overcast Days, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Lighting Outside for Photographs”, by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Kacey Gilpin

4.  Beware of Dappled Light!!

You may be asking "What is dappled light?"  Dappled light is the light coming through trees or other objects that leaves a crazy maze of light and shadows on your subjects. Little spots of highlights and shadows.  This often happens especially close to mid-day when the sun is overhead.  This makes it very difficult to expose properly and you end up with a speckled subject.  To avoid this, it could be a simple fix of moving your subject slightly to one side where there is more consistent shade. You can also try turning your subject around so the sun is at their back.

#4 Beware of Dappled Light, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Lighting Outside for Photographs” , by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Hazel and Haze Photography

#4 Beware of Dappled Light, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Lighting Outside for Photographs”, by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Hazel and Haze Photography

5. Avoid the eye squints

When shooting outdoors, you never want to face your subject straight into the sun.  You'll have squinty eyes and unhappy campers.  Always try to face your subjects with the sun behind them or at an angle to them, or again using an area of diffused light or open shade! 

#5 Avoid the Eye Squints, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Lighting Outside for Photographs” , by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Hazel and Haze Photography

#5 Avoid the Eye Squints, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Lighting Outside for Photographs”, by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Hazel and Haze Photography

6. Shoot during Golden Hour

The first hour and last hour of sunlight during the day is a photographer's holy grail!  Golden Hour is when the sunlight is softest and warm and makes just about anything look good.  Place your subject with the sun behind them or at a slight angle behind them and you'll be golden!  

#6 Golden Hour, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Lighting Outside for Photographs” , by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Hazel and Haze Photography

#6 Golden Hour, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Lighting Outside for Photographs”, by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Hazel and Haze Photography

Wondering when Golden Hour is?  Check out the SOL app, it gives you exact times of day when lighting is best. Also, if you have a weather app on your phone just check when sunset is and subtract and hour from that and start shooting then!

We hope these tips for finding the best outdoor lighting have helped!  Now go try them out!! We always love receiving feedback from our workshop attendees and followers with what you've been working on when shooting in manual mode.  Send us your pictures to www.kindredphotographyworkshop@gmail.com.  We love featuring you on our Instagram account - @kindredphotographyworkshops.

xoxo,

Angela and Kacey

Tips for Photographing Your Kids in Candid, Everyday Moments

1. Keep your camera out!  This may seem like a silly tip, but keeping your camera handy and where you see it daily can be a great visual reminder to practice shooting in manual mode. This reduces the risk of your camera sitting alone, in a dark closet somewhere not being used. Often times we might miss everyday moments because our camera isn't out and easily accessible.

#1 Keep Your Camera Out, “Tips for Photographing Your Kids in Candid, Everyday Moments,”  by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Hazel and Haze Photography

#1 Keep Your Camera Out, “Tips for Photographing Your Kids in Candid, Everyday Moments,” by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Hazel and Haze Photography

2. Photograph everyday rituals.  For this tip, just remember the age and attention span of your kiddos.  Most kids will have a preference to do their own thing and most kids are very active.  This way they are guiding the process. Examples: snack time, bath time, reading books, etc. This will allow kids to remain comfortable and in their everyday norm. 

#2 Photography Everyday Rituals, “Tips for Photographing Your Kids in Candid, Everyday Moments,”  by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Hazel and Haze Photography

#2 Photography Everyday Rituals, “Tips for Photographing Your Kids in Candid, Everyday Moments,” by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Hazel and Haze Photography

3. Give them an activity to do individually or with siblings.  When photographing candid moments, there is still some "set up" involved.  Create a small adventure with your kiddos. This may be venturing to the end of the street on a walk. During that walk you may find a stick, or a ball.  Or you may take a trip to the park and take a ride on a swing or a slide. Everyday moments can be big adventures in a child's eyes. Get creative!

#3 Give Them an Activity to Do, “Tips for Photographing Your Kids in Candid, Everyday Moments,”  by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Hazel and Haze Photography

#3 Give Them an Activity to Do, “Tips for Photographing Your Kids in Candid, Everyday Moments,” by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Hazel and Haze Photography

Bonus Tip: Try turning on some music while you are capturing candid shots in everyday life.  The beat of the music can either put that extra pep in a kid's step, or if it's a slower beat, provide a more calming atmosphere for quiet time like painting or reading books. Music can be a great reward too!

We hope these quick tips were helpful, and give you ideas to further explore the art of capturing those candid everyday moments. Enjoy the little things in life, for one day you'll look back and realize they were the big things.

With Love,

Angela & Kacey

Common Everyday Blessings

"As the years pass, I am coming more and more to understand that it is the common, everyday blessings of our common everyday lives for which we should be particularly grateful."

- Laura Ingalls Wilder

This quote couldn't ring more true for me today.  After having my daughter a little over two years ago, I now see the world differently.  I live for the little moments. The common everyday blessings.  I worry that I will forget these moments all together.  In this world of #hustle and striving for success and "go, go, go" it often times leaves little room or time to stop, breath, take it all in.  To be honest, this makes me really sad. But, I'm just as guilty! I've challenged myself to take out my camera at least once a week to capture dress up time, bath time, snack time, any time really. Because when we look back, after those times are gone, what will we have?  The only thing more precious than time is who we spend it with, so let's spend it wisely and try to capture it and never forget it.

- Angela, Kindred Photography Workshops

I read a quote by John Kabat- Zinn recently that hit the nail on the head. It goes, "The little things? The little moments? They aren't little."  Just take a scroll through your camera roll of iPhotos and you might agree with me.  The big moments and special occasions do stand out of course, but they are a shallow representation of our lives. For me, it's all the little moments that become the sum total and leave their little, but big stamps on our hearts. They are little moments that are precious everyday blessings and leave big impressions. Impressions that run so deep their feelings are never forgotten. I've always yearned to have images that match those feelings and memories which is why I picked up a camera years ago when my oldest was a toddler. I wanted to have photographs of those little moments that would last. I love taking a few photos every once in a while so that we can sit down years from now to laugh and cry over all those little things that have left big impressions.

- Kacey, Kindred Photography Workshops

BubbasFirstHairCut-13.jpg
BubbasFirstHairCut-5.jpg
photos by  Kacey Gilpin

photos by Kacey Gilpin

The Best Time to Take Photographs: The Golden Hour

Last week we shared about the 6 tips for finding the best lighting outdoors.  If you missed it, you can find the post here. Today we are going to talk specifically about the glorious "GOLDEN HOUR." If you haven't heard of this term, "golden hour" refers to the time shortly after sunrise and before sunset during which daylight is softer than when the sun is higher in the sky during the day.  

We could get super technical and talk to you all about how sun travels through a greater depth of atmosphere, reducing the intensity of the direct light, BUT we won't bore you with this type of info. Our main goal is to make the information we share on our blog simple, concise, and easy to put into practice.

In the middle of the day, the bright overhead sun can create unwanted strong highlights and dark shadows.  Because the contrast is less during the golden hour, shadows appear less dark, and highlights are less likely to be overexposed.

Example of golden hour,  “The Best Time to Take Photographs: The Golden Hour”  by  Kindred Photography Workshop  , photo by  Kacey Gilpin

Example of golden hour, “The Best Time to Take Photographs: The Golden Hour” by Kindred Photography Workshop , photo by Kacey Gilpin

We often get the question, "How do you get that light and airy feel to your images?"  Golden Hour plays a big part in this.  By shooting when the lighting is best you are more able to manipulate your settings on your camera to achieve that light and airy look.  

Example of golden hour,  “The Best Time to Take Photographs: The Golden Hour”  by  Kindred Photography Workshop  , photo by  Hazel and Haze Photography

Example of golden hour, “The Best Time to Take Photographs: The Golden Hour” by Kindred Photography Workshop , photo by Hazel and Haze Photography

If you are unsure of when "golden hour" typically occurs, it's safe to say the hour after sunrise and the hour before sunset.  There are lots of apps that can tell you when "golden hour" is, our favorite is the SOL app. As many of you know, the sun goes down at different times of the year. With this app, you can input the date, and it will tell you exactly when lighting is best! Win!

Example of golden hour,  “The Best Time to Take Photographs: The Golden Hour”  by  Kindred Photography Workshop  , photo by  Hazel and Haze Photography

Example of golden hour, “The Best Time to Take Photographs: The Golden Hour” by Kindred Photography Workshop , photo by Hazel and Haze Photography

One last tip we'll share with you today...since the golden hours have a lot of warm colored light, if you leave your camera on auto white balance, the camera will adjust its colors to be a little more blue to compensate. If you like the warmer tones, try shifting your white balance setting to "cloudy" or "shade" and it will bring back those warm tones.  

Example of golden hour,  “The Best Time to Take Photographs: The Golden Hour”  by  Kindred Photography Workshop  , photo by  Kacey Gilpin

Example of golden hour, “The Best Time to Take Photographs: The Golden Hour” by Kindred Photography Workshop , photo by Kacey Gilpin

Remember, the golden hour is not sunset or sunrise, but shortly before and after those times when your subject still has direct light falling on it.  The magical light will transform your photos from ordinary to extraordinary.  It's all about the light!

We hope these tips were helpful when working with the glorious Golden Hour!  We can't wait to see how you use the tips when practicing at home. Don't forget to tag @kindrephotographyworkshops on IG, we love sharing your work! 

With Love,

Angela & Kacey

6 Tips for Finding the Best Natural Light for Photos Inside

If you're like us, picking up your camera to take pictures of your kids "doing their thing" happens inside your home A LOT!  Some of the best memories captured are when they're playing in their rooms, reading with their siblings, or eating their first foods in their high chair.  

There are several things you can do to make the best use of the natural light inside your home when you're shooting on manual mode. Here are 6 tips to help you find the best natural light before you start snapping!

1. Choose a Room with Natural Light

There are rooms in every house that are dark and rooms in every house that have more windows and natural light.  Try using your camera when you're in your brighter rooms, or move to one of those rooms if there is something you're wanting to capture.  Also watch the light in these rooms throughout the day- you'll notice that the light color and quality changes throughout the day.  For instance, I know that I love taking photos upstairs on the South side of the house in the morning, and also downstairs on the West side of the house in the afternoon.

#1 Choose a Room with Natural Light , “ 6 Tips for Finding the Best Natural Light for Photos Inside”  by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Hazel and Haze Photography

#1 Choose a Room with Natural Light, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Natural Light for Photos Inside” by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Hazel and Haze Photography

2. Open the Blinds

Maximize the natural light coming through the windows by opening the curtains and blinds! You can even take it as far as looping the curtains up over the curtain rod to let even more light in. Every little bit helps. You will need to change your camera settings if you started shooting when the curtains or blinds were drawn. After you open them there is a lot more light inside the room and you can generally lower your ISO.

#2 Open the Blinds , “ 6 Tips for Finding the Best Natural Light for Photos Inside”  by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Kacey Gilpin

#2 Open the Blinds, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Natural Light for Photos Inside” by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Kacey Gilpin

3. Turn off the Lights

This is one of the simplest tips that makes the biggest difference! By turning off the electrical lights wherever you're shooting you can eliminate that yellowy tint and reflections those lights cause in your photos, allowing you to take advantage of the full color and quality of natural light. Turn out lamps as well as overhead lights in the ceiling.

#3 Turn Off the Lights , “ 6 Tips for Finding the Best Natural Light for Photos Inside”  by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Kacey Gilpin

#3 Turn Off the Lights, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Natural Light for Photos Inside” by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Kacey Gilpin

4. Move Your Subject Near the Window

Below each window, there is a pool of natural light.  Stand back from the windows and you will see that pool on the floor. These pools of light are great places to photograph your subject. Even in a late evening and low light situation, these pools of light near the window yield the perfect setting for catching your child's candid play or capturing your baby eating his messy, solid foods in his high chair.

#4 Move Your Subject Near the Window , '“ 6 Tips for Finding the Best Natural Light for Photos Inside”  by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Kacey Gilpin

#4 Move Your Subject Near the Window, '“6 Tips for Finding the Best Natural Light for Photos Inside” by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Kacey Gilpin

5. White Reflects Light

The color white reflects light and can be a natural reflector when you're taking pictures. Rooms with white walls, white bedding, and white furniture can be utilized this way by placing your subject to play or pose on or around these elements. (Tip: buy an inexpensive, large piece of white foam or poster board to use as a reflector)

#5 White Reflects Light, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Natural Light for Photos Inside”  by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Hazel and Haze Photography

#5 White Reflects Light, “6 Tips for Finding the Best Natural Light for Photos Inside” by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Hazel and Haze Photography

6. Open the Door

Similarly to the windows, you can use the front or back door as an ideal photo spot. Put your baby down to play with blocks or books in the door's pool of light. Try opening the door to let even more light inside an entryway or room!

We hope these tips help and inspire you to practice manual mode using natural light in your home!

#6 Open the Door ,  6 Tips for Finding the Best Natural Light for Photos Inside  by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Kacey Gilpin

#6 Open the Door, 6 Tips for Finding the Best Natural Light for Photos Inside by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Kacey Gilpin

 We hope these tips help you not only find the best natural light inside your home, but we hope they help you with your goals to capture every day life around the house!

With Love,

Angela and Kacey

Why do my photos look grainy? Three tips to decrease image noise.

Learning manual mode takes practice and there is more than enough trouble-shooting if you're learning how to use your camera.  One of the things you may have experienced as a new manual mode user is detecting a certain amount of grain in your photo.  If this is the case, you may have instances in which your photos look great in terms of proper exposure but look grainy or "fuzzy".  In photography terms, this grain is called "noise".  Here's an example of noise. 

An example of “noise” which is a grainy, pixelated look to the photography you get when your ISO setting is too high. ISO 2000

An example of “noise” which is a grainy, pixelated look to the photography you get when your ISO setting is too high. ISO 2000

If you think you might be experiencing image noise, the quickest way to diagnose this problem is to check your ISO number.  If your ISO number is in the 1000s range or higher, you're more than likely experiencing image noise- the product of using a high ISO setting on your digital camera. 

One component of the exposure triangle in manual mode photography is ISO. The higher the number, the more light your camera sensor absorbs, therefore increasing the exposure of your image. However, increasing the ISO too high results in image noise, which is why it's important to keep your ISO number as low as possible when taking your shot.

If your images are noisy, don't worry! It's an easy problem to fix and we have three easy adjustments you can make to get the photos you're wanting!

1. Lower your ISO number.

The first adjustment you need to make is to lower your ISO number. Lowering your ISO number will immediately fix the issue of noise. It will darken your image quite a bit, however, so you will need to try the following tips to get back to gaining the correct exposure.

TIP: We recommend keeping your ISO at 1600 or below as a rule of thumb to avoid noise. The clearest, sharpest images are achieved through shooting the lowest ISO possible at your desired exposure.

 

2. Adjust your shutter speed and aperture accordingly.

There are three components to the exposure triangle. These three components balance together to create the perfect exposure. If you lower your ISO number, you will then need to adjust your shutter speed and aperture numbers accordingly.  Typically, you can lower your your shutter speed and/or aperture after lowering your ISO and get the exposure you're looking for! 

TIP: Try adjusting shutter speed and aperture one at a time, and one step at a time. Take test shots each time you make an adjustment and look at your image until you get the desired result. Taking it one step at a time will keep you from getting confused about which adjustments are getting your closer to the correct exposure.

3. Increase the amount of natural light available.

At Kindred we stress finding the best natural light for your photos. Perhaps the easiest trick in the book is increasing the amount of natural light available in your shot. Try opening the blinds and curtains if you haven't already, or opening a nearby door.

TIP: Don't have any more natural light available? Try moving your object or subject closer to a natural light source OR moving yourself at a different angle in relation to the light and the subject. Sometimes adjust the location of the camera allows more light onto the cameras sensor.

After lowering the ISO to 1000 and then making a quick adjustment to the shutter speed by bumping it up one notch, you can see that the following photograph lack the previous photo's image noise and appears much sharper!

Decreased “noise” in photograph by lowering ISO to 1000 and decreasing shutterspeed

Decreased “noise” in photograph by lowering ISO to 1000 and decreasing shutterspeed

If today's post on ISO noise was helpful, check out our other posts about the exposure triangle by starting with aperture here.

With Love,

Angela + Kacey

Tips for Choosing ISO Settings Outside

Are you needing help with camera settings in manual mode? For those of us with basic camera knowledge in manual mode, it can still be challenging to choose camera settings in the moment, especially with the added challenge of changing light or moving children!  It takes practice to become comfortable quickly choosing settings and we're here to help you get there!  We're going to break some tips down according to lighting situations over the next few weeks in a way that will help you decide how to choose the best settings in real life situations!

QUICK REVIEW

The exposure triangle (ISO, shutter speed and aperture) all work together to create a balance to create the exposure of your photograph. Changing one of these settings will change the exposure of your photograph. Find our previous posts explaining ISOAperture, and Shutter Speed if you need an extra review to jog your memory! 

QUICK TIPS

The following quick tips are about ISO. Remember that you want to keep your ISO as low as possible for image quality purposes. We recommend staying well under ISO 1600 to avoid noise, which is a fuzzy, pixelated look to the photo. 

Here are several outdoor lighting situations and some suggested setting tips to help you get started the next time you're snapping photos outside! 

1. Full Sun. In most cases, outside in full sun, an ISO of 100 is necessary to bring about the exposure triangle. Full sun puts so much light onto the camera sensor that a low ISO and high shutter speed are required. As a result, a shutter speed of at least 1/1000 can be expected. In some situations such as the beach or a bright snowy day, an ISO of 100 and a shutter speed as high as 1/3200 is necessary.

ISO in Full Sun ,  Tips for Choosing ISO Settings Outside  by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Kacey Gilpin

ISO in Full Sun, Tips for Choosing ISO Settings Outside by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Kacey Gilpin

2. Golden Hour. The hour after sunrise and the hour before sunset, otherwise known as "The Golden Hour", is the most photographer's preferred shooting time because of the soft, diffused light. An ISO setting ofaround 640-800 is a great place to start!

ISO During Golden Hour, Tips for Choosing ISO Settings Outside  by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Hazel and Haze Photography

ISO During Golden Hour, Tips for Choosing ISO Settings Outside by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Hazel and Haze Photography

3. Shade on a Sunny Day. Similarly, shade provided by buildings or trees are preferred shooting locations because of the diffused light it provides- bright enough for sufficient light, yet absent of harsh shadows or dappled light.  In these two lighting situations, your camera's sensor will detect less light than in full sun. In this case, you can lower your shutter speed and raise your ISO settings from the settings described in "full sun" the situation above.  An ISO setting of 200 is a great place to start! If you exposure is still too dark, you can lower your shutter speed as well to compensate.

ISO in the Shade on a Sunny Day, Tips for Choosing ISO Settings Outside  by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Kacey Gilpin

ISO in the Shade on a Sunny Day, Tips for Choosing ISO Settings Outside by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Kacey Gilpin

4. Overcast Day in the Open. Hip hip hooray for cloudy days! Clouds provide the perfect diffuser and create an ideal lighting situations at just about any time of the day.  ISO 200 is a good place to start on an overcast day out in the open. 

ISO on an Overcast Day in the Open, Tips for Choosing ISO Settings Outside  by  Kindred Photography Workshops , photo by  Kacey Gilpin

ISO on an Overcast Day in the Open, Tips for Choosing ISO Settings Outside by Kindred Photography Workshops, photo by Kacey Gilpin

As with every skill in life, practice is key! We hope the examples provided are a great jumping off point to help you practice your manual mode photography skills and further your ability to tell your story through photography! 

Stay tuned for the next post featuring ISO tips indoors!

With Love,

Angela + Kacey

Our Top 5 Camera Gear Must- Haves for Beginners

Hello, hello!  

We're checking in this summer with some of our new camera gear must-haves for beginners!  You're going to love this list: stylish, useful, and affordable.

1 | We've recently stumbled upon Gatta, which makes chic, designer-worthy mini camera bags that are budget-friendly prices. If you're in the market for a camera bag, Gatta bags are the perfect way to protect your camera and stay stylish at the same time. We love the color and style options available! 

2 | As always, we've include the "nifty fifty" lens because it's the best upgrade your camera can get from your kit lenses. We believe it's the most affordable way to upgrade your camera and here's why: f1.8 allows you to get a lot more light and depth of field into your photos! We've included links to Canon, Nikon, and Sony lenses for your specific camera manufacturer. Make sure to double check your camera model's mount compatibility before purchasing!

Already have a 50mm? Try the 35mm focal length. It's also a favorite of ours!

4 | Another easy but necessary addition to your camera gear is a memory card with 90 MB/s or or faster processing.  Storing your photos on a memory card that has faster reading and writing speed will ensure that your memory card can keep up with all the clicks when your photographing your children at play or your pets speeding by. We've included our favorite memory card recommendation below- it's fast and high quality!

5 | Last but not least is a must-have for beginner photographers. Whether you're photographing food, your kids, or a client, a camera strap is always a good idea to help protect your camera!  There are hundreds of options out there to fit your personal style- anything from braided letter to nylon. We've included one of our favorites to get you started, but we also recommend searching Amazon and Etsy to find your personal preference.

musthavespinterest.png

1 | Gatta Lola Miel Camera Bag 2 | "Nifty Fifty" 50 mm 1.8 Lens Canon, Nikon, Sony 3 | Pelican SD Card Case 4 | Lexar Professional 16GB SD Card 5 | Lifemate Camera Strap

As always, if you need help reach out to us at kindredphotographyworkshop@gmail.com. We'd love to hear from you!

With Love,

Angela + Kacey

The Nifty Fifty Lens Recommendation for Beginners

We get this question A LOT!! "What lens should I get for my DSLR camera?" Well, you are in the right place, friend! We are going to give you all the best advice on which lens would be the BEST first investment to begin documenting your family's life.  

One advantage of most DSLRs is the ability to switch lenses.  This allows you to choose from a variety of different focal lengths.  There are two kinds of lenses: prime lenses and zoom lenses.

A prime lens is a lens with a fixed focal length. Which means you have to move closer or further away from your subject. A prime lens typically has a larger maximum aperture so they perform better in low light situations, also creating a better depth of field (your subject in focus and the background blurred).

A zoom lens is just as described. You can "zoom" in and out from your subject.  The complexity of the zoom lens makes them a bit less sharp and they are prey to greater amounts of lens problems such as distortion, chromatic aberration and vignetting. Ideally, you want the sharpest, cleanest, lowest light shooting lens which would be a prime lens.

Most DSLR cameras will come with one or two "kit" lenses.  These are typically zoom lenses.  Your BEST first investment would be a prime lens to get the best quality images.  We love to share about what we call the "nifty fifty."

Introducing the 50mm 1.8 lens! It is small and compact, but it is a beast when it comes to quality, and at around $100-200 the price can't be beat!  Both Canon and Nikon offer a "nifty fifty." They have recently also come out with a mirrorless camera 50 mm prime lens option as well!  For this post we'll be showing you a Sony option, but there are many other options of lenses when it comes to mirrorless camera systems.

If you click on the description below it will take you straight to a link where you can purchase your very own "nifty fifty"!

Canon 50 mm 1.8  “Nifty Fifty” Lens Recommendation from  Kindred Photography Workshops

Canon 50 mm 1.8 “Nifty Fifty” Lens Recommendation from Kindred Photography Workshops

Nikon 50 mm 1.8  “Nifty Fifty” lens recommendation from  w

Nikon 50 mm 1.8 “Nifty Fifty” lens recommendation from w

Sony 50 mm 1.8  “Nifty Fifty” lens recommendation for beginners from  Kindred Photography Workshop

Sony 50 mm 1.8 “Nifty Fifty” lens recommendation for beginners from Kindred Photography Workshop

As always, we are happy to answer any questions you have about your camera and lenses! We hope you found this helpful and we hope this has offered you options of your next camera investment. These lenses make great Christmas, Mother's Day, and birthday gifts! 

With Love,

Angela + Kacey